NASA to drop term ‘black hole’ after word condemned as derogatory towards Afro-American women

NASA has confirmed it will stop using the term “black hole” after a review board of the space research agency has deemed it derogatory towards Afro-American women.

The term black hole has since the 1960s been in use to define a region of spacetime where gravity is so strong that nothing—no particles or even electromagnetic radiation such as light—can escape from it.

Ebony Diamond, a Black Lives Matter spokeswoman, said that several civil rights organizations had been pressuring NASA to stop using the derogatory term for years until this week.

“A black hole is as offensive a term to describe the reproductive organs of Afro-American women than the use of the words blackberry cobbler, purple taco, or jigaboo canoe,” BLM spokeswoman, Ebony Diamond, said during a press conference.

Ebony Diamond, a Black Lives Matter spokeswoman, said during a press conference that the use of the term “black hole” is a patriarchal term with a racist history, imposed on the Afro-American people.

“We are sorry for any harm or painful association the term ‘black hole’ may have caused to the Afro-American community and believe the term is now obsolete,” said NASA this week.

Various names have been proposed to replace the former term although NASA has not settled on a specific one at the moment.

“The scientific community has agreed that it should honor the man who originally first coined the theory of black holes: Jonathan Spook,” one NASA official explained.

Experts agree that the most probable term to be chosen will be that of a “spook hole”, a clear reference to Oxford-based astrophysicist Jonathan Spook, the discoverer of black holes.

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