USA: Viking Artefacts Discovered Near Great Lakes

viking

Michigan| A group of amateur archaeologists searching for the remains of a native american settlements near the town of Cheboygan, on the coast of Lake Huron, have uncovered a large quantity of artefacts, allegedly of Norse or Viking origin. A total of 194 objects, mostly made from various metals including silver, iron, copper and tin, were found on what could be the site of an ancient viking trade post, controlling the Straights of Mackinac, that leads to Lake Michigan.

The artefacts are of various nature and geographical origin. Swords, axes and other weapons from Scandinavian or Germanic origin, silver buttons and a balance scale allegedly from the British isles, hair combs and knife handles made of walrus ivory and originating from Greenland or Iceland… The presence of all these goods suggests an elaborate and efficient economic system based on long-distance trade.

Archaeologists had been searching the eastern coast of North America for signs of the passage of Norsemen, ever since the discovery in 1960 of the site of l’Anse aux Meadows, in Newfoundland, Canada. Many items found on that first site had suggested that an elaborate network of trade existed between that specific Norse colony and the American continent. Such clues included the remains of butternuts, which didn’t grow on any land north of the province of New Brunswick, and therefore had to be “imported”. Other possible Norse outposts were identified in 2012, in Nanook, in the Tanfield Valley on Baffin Island, as well as in Nunguvik, on the Willows Island and the Avayalik Islands.

This is however the first Viking settlement discovered in the area of the North American Great Lakes, and this could bring a lot of new information concerning the actual extent of their trade network on the continent. The site is strategically located to enable control of the waterways leading to both Lake Michigan and Lake Erie, while enabling a navigable access to the St-Lawrence Bassin and the Atlantic Ocean. All of the items already already recovered have been transfered for further analysis to the Department of Archaeology of the University of Michigan, which has also inherited the responsability for the site. Further research should be done over the next months to complete the survey of the site and gather all possible remaining artefacts.

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Comments


  1. Double concerned on May 27, 2014 at 4:01 am said:

    I just hope these items don’t disappear in the great black hole of “official custody“ like everything else does

    • Paracelsus on May 27, 2014 at 7:11 pm said:

      LOL! There’s *always* a conspiracy involved.

    • Jon McLean on May 28, 2014 at 1:16 am said:

      “…being examined by Top men.”

      “Who?”

      “TOP men!”

    • Debra on May 28, 2014 at 3:13 am said:

      Yeah, like the giant, 9 to 12 feet long skeletons that were unearthed on a farm, in Michigan. The Smithsonian was called, took them for further study and that was the end of them. The official word is, they’re missing.

    • Myron Paine on May 28, 2014 at 5:50 pm said:

      Yes, the suppression of Norse in America started 650 years ago and continues today with the dismissal of Patricia Sutherland in November 2o12. See PARADIGM SHIFT: SUPPRESSION.

      The official word on this find may be that the Kikkapoh (Old Norse for I saw the whale spout) Indians used the English artifacts for balast in their canoes.

    • Myron Paine on May 28, 2014 at 5:53 pm said:

      Yes, the suppression of Norse in America started 650 years ago and continues today with the dismissal of Patricia Sutherland in November 2o12. See PARADIGM SHIFT: SUPPRESSION.

      The official word on this find may be that the Kikkapoh (Old Norse for I saw the whale spout) Indians used the English artifacts for balast in their canoes.

      PARACELSUS. What is the going pay rate for suppressors these days?

    • Thomas Donsbach on June 2, 2014 at 8:35 pm said:

      Who is Columbus?

    • nubwaxer on June 11, 2014 at 7:10 pm said:

      STFU with your ridiculous conspiracy theory. ever been to a museum? they are all over the world and display these type items. that’s what a museum is for. beside they are private property belonging to the people who found them. they have every right to keep them away from wackos like you.

  2. Alesund on May 27, 2014 at 4:58 am said:

    They’ve found quite a few places with Viking/Norse artifacts in the United States. They traveled all over the US. It’s fascinating to see how little we really do know historically. It’s an expanding field that is very non linear. Every year we find out something new, and it expands on what we knew. Very cool :)

    • Ebbi on May 28, 2014 at 8:11 am said:

      We called it Vínland (Wineland)

    • Knut on May 28, 2014 at 8:04 pm said:

      Ebbi, “Vin Land” means Meadow Land in english

    • Brynja on May 28, 2014 at 8:48 pm said:

      Knut – Ebbi is right, in Icelandic it means Wineland and according to the Sagas, it´s the right meaning!

    • there is much we dont know about ancient america , not only is this been surpressed in history , but also the star people they have depicted on the walls , i believe there was once a thriving civilization , and in some cases far more tech then our modern one !

    • Terri on May 29, 2014 at 2:41 am said:

      “vineland” at the time it was names didn’t mean “wine” or “vine”.

    • Bjorn on May 30, 2014 at 4:44 pm said:

      “Vinland” meant “plain land” in the old Norse language.

    • Not sure where all the various opinions come from, but “Vinland” means literally “Wineland” in Old Norse. “Grape” was called “vinber”. “vind” and “vinr” were also the base sounds for many other words – “vind” meaning “wind” or “air” and “vinr” meaning “friend”. Opposites usually had a vowel in front so “enemy” was “óvinr”. “Vinr” and “vin” were pronounced differently as “inr” was more towards an e[ä]and “in” was more towards “ee”[i]hence the modern spelling of wine in for example Swedish “vin” and “vän” being “friend”.

    • Sten on June 6, 2014 at 11:16 am said:

      Vinland could mean either land of vines or grassy land. It is interesting that Leif Eriksson also named today’s Labrador (Markland) and Baffin Island (Helluland). Mark means ground or land and hellu means (sloping) rocks.

  3. Melodie Kaye on May 27, 2014 at 1:20 pm said:

    They have found artifacts from the Viking and Celtic cultures deep into this continent. Not surprising since we have multi-tribes here from Asia and Europe. I’m curious what modern man would find to do with his\her time, if we weren’t using most of it for technological entertainment.

  4. Paula on May 27, 2014 at 2:10 pm said:

    Well wonder if they will have to re-write history on who discovered America now. lol

    • Anne on May 27, 2014 at 8:51 pm said:

      Why? The Native Americans formerly called indians discovered it first. Maaany thousand years before the Viking Age. No re-writing, just a little adding – if the article wasnt a joke. Take a look at some of the other articles on this site, they’re all a bit far out…

    • Thorleif on May 27, 2014 at 10:33 pm said:

      We Vikings were the first Europeans to set foot ashore the North American continent and thus we are the first Europeans to discover America!
      Columbus re-discovered it, since the Christian murderers destroyed nearly every kind of record of our voyages!

    • Magnus on May 28, 2014 at 6:27 am said:

      Thorleif, “we vikings”, no. None of us are vikings, saying you are because you are scandinavian or of norse ancestry, does not make you a viking(I am a norwegian). Most of our ancestors were not vikings either, viking was a profession, going viking was a act.

      To me it seems most know about Leif Eriksson by now, dont exactly something that has been hidden or “buried”.

    • paul on May 28, 2014 at 12:21 pm said:

      I’m an OLD American and we were taught in grade school about Leif Eriksson. It’s pretty common knowledge here. The only thing I can’t figure out is why we still celebrate Columbus Day…

    • franco on May 28, 2014 at 12:24 pm said:

      No, actually it was the Chinese.

    • Deonne on May 28, 2014 at 4:14 pm said:

      Thorleif, if you really knew anything about the ancestry you claim, the first part would be that “Viking” is not a noun, it is a verb. You cannot be “a Viking”, you can only go “a Viking.”

    • wordwyzard on May 28, 2014 at 6:45 pm said:

      The American mainland was originally settled by antedeluvian people before the great deluge. They were a highly developed culture however most of the evidence has vanished long before the appearance of any other interlopers.

    • Brynja on May 28, 2014 at 8:55 pm said:

      Actually Deonne, in Icelandic we have the noun víkingur which is a man that goes viking, but I don´t think we have any Icelandic Vikings today :-)

    • Maybe they will have to change Columbus day to Leif Erickson day.

    • JimB on May 29, 2014 at 12:53 am said:

      I have often wondered if the English word “fighting” is related to viking as in “go a viking” or as I wonder “go a fighting”.

    • FORMERLY called Indians? I call them Indians right now. That’s the correct name.

    • Peter Brülls on May 29, 2014 at 5:39 pm said:

      @paul You have an official Columbus Day because US catholics wanted to have a holiday about a catholic “hero”.

    • Motstraumen on May 29, 2014 at 9:33 pm said:

      We have a whole team of Vikings in Minnesota..and many Northern Highschool have too…Even some Viqueens.lol It is interesting to see how we tend to go after each other over trivial stuff. If someone wants to call themselves a viking let them…I will instead call my self an Iowegian and Nordfjording.not the horse btw.

    • Aunt Sally on May 30, 2014 at 12:17 am said:

      The Native American DNA came back as being Euro Asian. Which means the chinese and europeans were the first on US soil. The whole indian thing is just propaganda

    • Mike on May 30, 2014 at 6:31 am said:

      Vik-ing. “Bay inhabitant.” It is a noun.

    • John on May 31, 2014 at 5:15 am said:

      Actually those natives we refer to as “Indians” were the ones that stayed behind along the journey to South America when the Maya and Inca traveled from the great lakes region west across the rockies then southward through Mexico and into South America where they eventually settled and developed trade routes on land AND ocean via the gulf of mexico…check out Track Rock GA and then think about places named “Maiami”…

    • John on May 31, 2014 at 5:16 am said:

      Sorry, *”Miami”.

    • John on May 31, 2014 at 5:19 am said:

      Scott Wolter presents a fair amount of evidence to most of this in his program titled “America Unearthed”.

  5. William Smith on May 27, 2014 at 5:39 pm said:

    The first man that went across to the west was Called Naddoddur and he was from the Faroe Islands, then Leif Erikson became the first Viking to explore the land of Vinland.

    • Jørn on May 28, 2014 at 5:52 pm said:

      Well, the inhabitants of he Farou island were norwegian settlers. This man never went ashore, but he was probably the first european to see the continent. Leiv Ericson sat foot and started the colony. I have never heard about gealic artifacts found, except those which perhaps the vikings brought with them. …… and what is this about “viking” not being a noun?

  6. 5neadster on May 27, 2014 at 6:22 pm said:

    We must not forget the Kennewick Man from 11,000 years ago who was of european decent and the remains were turned over to native Americans whose sole intent is to remain the original inhabitants in North America for the benefits they receive from the US Government.

    • Jerry Estopinal on May 27, 2014 at 7:00 pm said:

      Yes, why is there a conspiracy to hide Kennewick man? Is it because he is a caucasoid?

    • Keesey on May 27, 2014 at 7:44 pm said:

      A recent analysis of mitochondrial DNA from another “palaeoamerican” with supposedly Caucasoid features showed affinities to modern Native Americans and Siberians, not Europeans. Kennewick Man is probably as Caucasoid as Ainu people — i.e., not at all.

    • Carl on May 27, 2014 at 11:14 pm said:

      Kennewick Man is at the University of Washington Burke Museum. However, access is very limited. If I remember correctly, some bones went missing.

    • Aunt Sally on May 30, 2014 at 12:19 am said:

      You would think since they are ” sovereign” they would not be allowed to accept American Tax dollar benefits. They should live on their own “sovereign monies” but no….that would not be possible when there is free white money laying around.

    • The remains weren’t turned over to the Native Americans. Read the news. I guess, “read the archives” since it happened so long ago. The Natives felt it was an ancestor, since it was their territory they’d been on for ages. If someone digs up your family graveyard looking for stuff, of course you’re going to question if what they find is related to you or not. As others have said: The University of New Mexico deemed the remains resembled Polynesians or the Ainu, AND they are in the Burke Museum at this moment. Ease up on the tinfoil hat, because it’s not working.

      Meanwhile, all the things in this world, both good and bad, and Aunt Sally picks Native Americans as something to be angry about. Nice priority, Sally. I’m sure you feel Manhattan was a ripoff on our end, and the Trail of Tears got that name from the unbridled joy of forced marches.

      You guys are choice catches. I’m sure this has nothing to do with being anonymous (you’re on the internet, after all- what name you post by isn’t enough) and more with spouting garbage at every opportunity.

  7. Svanur Thorkelsson on May 27, 2014 at 11:57 pm said:

    After Leifur Eiríksson found out from Bjarni Herjólfsson about the land we now call America, he sailed over there and tried to settle it. Several expedition were undertaken by his family members and others after that. They all failed to colonize the continent. However some of the natives were brought back to Iceland and today 500 Icelanders now alive have been identified having native north-american genes, dating back before the year 1200. – Also there is definitely connection between the game the Micmac Indians of Nova Scotia played on ice, and modern ice hockey was developed from, and the game the vikings played, called Ískanttleikur. The rules were almost identical. – Another thing, Columbus never reached the continent of North-America.

    • Emmanuel on May 28, 2014 at 1:42 pm said:

      La crosse as it is now called, was a game played by the native american waaaay before the vikings even came here, and it wasn’t played on ice, it was played on any type of surface any time of the year.

    • Emmanuel on May 28, 2014 at 1:47 pm said:

      Just saying also, the game spread out to other native americans tribe, but it originated from the Algonquian.

  8. Erik Rurikson on May 28, 2014 at 1:15 am said:

    The photo with this article does not match the description of the artifacts in the article. However, IF these are legit Nordic artifacts it would be a major coup for those, such as I, who have always contended that the Northmen would have continued exploring and sought out the Great Lakes for its many natural resources, especially the copper of Lake Superior.
    I doubt very much that ANYONE in the Anthropology department at UofM has ANY expertice in identifying Viking Age artifacts. Thus, if this story is not totally quashed into obscurity, i expect there to be a pronouncement by the folks at UofM that the objects are not Norse, but from the colonial era, say circa 1600AD and then they will be “lost” in a mislabeled bin in the basement.
    I want PHOTOS of the objects published where the public can see them and actual experts can give their opinion.
    I have degrees in history and anthropology and specialized in handling metal artifacts at an archaeology lad (as a student). My master’s thesis was on the archaeological and literary evidence of Northmen among the Mediaval Slavs. So, I would especially like to be put in touch with anyone involbved in this discovery.
    erikrurikson@yahoo.com

    • William Conner on May 28, 2014 at 2:24 am said:

      Give em hell, Erik! Ms. Sutherland of Canada found more evidence of precolumbian Old World contact and was fired for finding the wrong stuff!

    • Michael Z. Williamson on May 28, 2014 at 4:31 am said:

      William: No doubt why he’s publishing on a site that proclaims “Man builds space shuttle using 3D printer.”

      ;-)

    • Jørn on May 28, 2014 at 5:56 pm said:

      Well, some of the artifacts on the picture are unmistakably of “viking origin”. Look at the sword for instance. Viking settlement has long ago been proven, see L’Ance aux Meadows.

    • David on June 2, 2014 at 6:21 pm said:

      Well, I am from the Cheboygan, Michigan area. I know of this great find of late. Most digs in that area are for the Colonial French and English settlements, or the Native American settlements.
      As for claims that the Norse or Danes were here “first” (Europeans), there is also recent debate on the Irish being here around 450 – 500 AD. That is what they all are – claims. Until someone can show definitive proof, it is all speculation, and all up for debate.

  9. StartPartly on May 28, 2014 at 4:31 am said:

    Calling BS on this. Nothing outside the echo chamber to corroborate, and the first to pick it up was the ever-credible, outstanding and honorable guys over at Stormfront. Yeah, the Nazis. I smell just a bit of beef butt byproduct.

  10. RJBose on May 28, 2014 at 5:24 am said:

    It is also possible that the goods, while Viking in origin, were brought to the Great Lakes location through subsequent trading with indigenous groups who exchanged goods between the East Coast (and the verified Viking settlement) and other tribes farther west, changing hands several times (over many years, if not generations).

  11. Ted Bruning on May 28, 2014 at 9:25 am said:

    All fascinating stuff, but historically a complete dead end. There’s no denying that those crazy Scandinavians were like ants at a picnic – they got pretty much everywhere! – and given the geography of the North Atlantic littorals it would be weird if none of them had made it to North America. But by the time Western Europeans started settling Canada in earnest there was no trace of them, which reduces all this archaeology to the status of an interesting but not especially enlightening sideshow. Maybe more stuff will show up; but what of it?

    • Andy Betts on May 28, 2014 at 3:41 pm said:

      Viking artifacts- a ring of chain mail and a carved talisman- were found about halfway up the coast Ellesmere Island at a place called Alexandra Fiord in Buchanan Bay. That’s much farther north than any documentary shows.

    • Remko on May 28, 2014 at 6:37 pm said:

      You have to understand that archaeology is an 18th century thing. So you’re point about there being no trace of them is rather invalid. There were traces, but they were never sought after.

    • Remko on May 28, 2014 at 6:38 pm said:

      your* long day at work…:P

  12. Shane on May 28, 2014 at 9:50 am said:

    No surprise about the find. Where it ends up, and how widely it gets scattered is another matter.
    “A viking we will go” In my understanding, viking means raider or raiding. Science is continually making assumptions and revising assumptions. We may well find that an Atlantis really did exist. Certainly, human history is being revised on a continuous basis. Native Americans … arrived something like 20,000 years ago. I reckon that trading has been taking place between Europe and continental N. America, South Africa and The Far East for over 1000 years. Many routes were jealously guarded though, and records would have been kept hidden and eventually lost.

  13. Roland Scales on May 28, 2014 at 12:30 pm said:

    Who were the amateur archaeologists and where’s the proof? I can’t find any independent corroboration of this article, and as it happens the photo is the property of the Norwegian University of Science and Technology, and is used on their website to corroborate the findings of a dig near Trondheim.

    I’m sure the scholarly community would love to see definitive evidence of a Norse presence in the Great Lakes area, and if it was present they certainly wouldn’t try to hush it up! Just think of the major breakthrough achieved with the uncovering of an Anglo-Saxon ship burial at Sutton Hoo, England, in 1938. Scholars and the public alike were delighted at the finds, even though it was excavated by an amateur. It was carried out correctly, and that didn’t detract from its value.

    • Ringulf on June 17, 2014 at 3:52 pm said:

      Thank you! Finally one voice on this whole thread that is creditable and making sense! If I were to put stock in any one contributor to this article and it’s feedback, this one would be the one I would select. Honestly we have several launguage scholars arguing over words that come from both the Old Norse and Modern Icelandic, which granted are similar, but have had a lot of common usage and history to seperate them.
      We have also had the oft used and still Historically constipated arguement of the tense of the word viking, (it is, has been and can be both, though narrow-minded history snobs love to quote the verb tense to make themselves seem superior)
      Yet We really have not had more than paranoid conspiracy theorists look at the fact that if this find were legit, it would be very significant and thus a positive link to history. I don’t think that evidence like this if it were substantiated could be supressed, and to what purpose? We already credit Leif the find, what more could deepening our understanding of the extent of the Norse presence in North America do to undermine all these dangerous close-minded Primocolumbianites!(such bad people…ignorance is bliss, is it not?)

  14. Eric Michael on May 28, 2014 at 3:05 pm said:

    Where is Scott Wolter from History Channel when you need him. I expect this could be an episode of America Unearthed soon.

  15. Robson on May 28, 2014 at 3:51 pm said:

    great, now the History Channel can do a new season of “Vikings” coming in North America!

    • raul koefoed on May 29, 2014 at 1:39 am said:

      I’ve seen a very good movie about that some years ago, cant remember the name

  16. Sherry on May 28, 2014 at 9:01 pm said:

    Small spellcheck: it’s the Straits of Mackinac (not Straights).

  17. It’s the “Straits of Mackinac’ not Straights of Mackinac.

  18. Mike Dore on May 28, 2014 at 11:08 pm said:

    This is a significant find for the region. I would also wonder who edited this article, as it is filled with spelling errors.

  19. raul koefoed on May 29, 2014 at 1:34 am said:

    Just a couple of things to keep in mind:
    Scandinavians were the last europeans to be christianized
    Norway at that time was danish.
    It doesn’t matter if the Word “viking” started as a verb, languages evolve and now is a noun.
    You may think that anglo-saxon is British, but both áreas are from the south of Denmark- north of Germany. Boundaries at that time were “elastic”
    Scandinavians were germanic tribes.
    Both sides at Hasting’s battle were vikings.
    You’ll be surprised if you highlight in any page of any book in english all the words of latin and danish origin, you’ll paint almost all the page. Just try
    Erick, that sounds so Nordic, comes from italian Enrico and Raul (my name) that sounds so hispanic, comes from germanic Wolf.
    Runes may have been re-discovered, not re-invented, see similarity
    with roman types.
    And so on, history and prehistory are not completly revealed. May be only a time machine could tell us all the truth.
    So I would be more cautius in statements.

  20. Erickson on May 29, 2014 at 2:19 am said:

    Hey, those are mine!

  21. Louis Shalako on May 29, 2014 at 2:34 am said:

    Boy, wouldn’t it be weird if Le Griffon had been found, and these were 17th century artifacts.

  22. treeman on May 29, 2014 at 7:23 am said:

    LOl desperate for some recognition of the Viking culture of invasion and murder, pillage and plunder in the US? Maybe that is the explanation for the way Americans behave now. Nothing to be proud of really.

    • Bronco53 on May 29, 2014 at 2:58 pm said:

      Despite this comment clearly being foolish nationalism-trolling, I have to point out: you’re an idiot.

      The nordic culture of the time revolved primarily around farming and herding (like everyone else in Europe) with the notable addition of a vast trade network (which was pretty unique). Raiding was relatively rare, and moreover, was common among most cultures of the time- to include the native Americans, for whom (many tribes, at least), honor-based warfare and hostage-taking were considered viable industries.

      Take your blind nationalism elsewhere, churl.

  23. Valdimar on May 29, 2014 at 12:50 pm said:

    Icelandic traders roamed north America for hundred of years. They continued from Leif and Karlsefnis time. They roamed the North Artic where the trade was done with food and walrus rope used for rigging on large ship´s. After the hemp rope came in to the market thee was not much business up north so what do people do, go south. Sutherland has pointed this out both on Baffin and Labrador. There is a line of cairns leading up from Green bay on Lake Michigan towards lake Huron where this site with those artifact’s are believed to be. The photo is probably from some museum some say British. Our history books tell of Merchants going to North America before Erik the red and Leif his son and just think being a trader not Viking you would not bypass trade goods sellable in Europe. We happen to have list of trade goods coming through Iceland and on to Norway. There are all kind of information in our literature that has not be seen by foreign scholars but still they fight our existence in NA.I wonder why. Did they kill us of like natives. British hated Icelander as they thought them to be Viking. They were not and trade goods was not bought from so called Vikings in Iceland meaning stolen goods.

  24. Valdimar on May 29, 2014 at 1:04 pm said:

    Narragansett runestone has runes of Icelandic origin aswell as the Icelandic word Skraumilgr an ancient word meaning Srauma river in west Iceland. Place of known traders departure and trade place to the west.

  25. Dirk on May 29, 2014 at 1:56 pm said:

    As ye guys noo aye ….. the native Americans are fro’ Asia and killed the real habs in this country…..tae gae a Viking is right an’ fro’ north O’Germany up tae Finland uir ancestries went o’Viking far even tae China. Naet tae forget ‘at the Norge had been the last one who celebrated uir old Gods( what we still do at haeme) and tae find Gaelic relicts in between….o’coorse had been all o’us under Gaelic influence.

  26. mick on May 29, 2014 at 4:55 pm said:

    Firstly, Roland Scales, runes weren’t re-invented by the nazis. They were used by the nazis’ but were already ‘re-discovered’ well before. That’s if in fact they had ever fallen totally into disuse, which is not known for sure.
    Secondly, everyone, there are strong traditions of Irish seafarers reaching North America’ and records of traders from Bristol in England reaching North America, both before leif Erikson and co.

  27. mick on May 29, 2014 at 5:03 pm said:

    Firstly, Roland Scales, runes were never re-invented by the Nazis, just used by them. They had been re-discovered well before then, if in fact they had ever fallen totally into disuse, which is not known for sure.
    Secondly, everyone, there are strong traditions of Irish seafarers reaching North America, as well as records of traders from Bristol doing so, both before Leif Erikson and co.

  28. wrupp on May 29, 2014 at 9:50 pm said:

    Lizzie Borden must have been of viking descent, she used an axe on her parents…..

  29. Richard on May 29, 2014 at 11:49 pm said:

    Reply to DCM re:”Fomerly called Indians”. Colombus set out to and thought he discovered INDIA. So naturally, the first humans he encountered were to him “Indians” from India. : I also agree that the artifacts were probably traded over and over again amongst the many tribes of aboriginals for many years and miles before ending up at their final resting place.

  30. Dave "The Kraut" on May 30, 2014 at 5:50 am said:

    I find it funny that we keep playing this game called “who was here first.” Until we start seeing each other as the same race, human, we will keep playing these silly games.

  31. Barb Pratt on May 30, 2014 at 12:27 pm said:

    Control the waterways to Lake Michigan and Lake Erie? How is that even possible? Maybe Lake Michigan and Lake Huron? That would make sense.

  32. François Landry on May 30, 2014 at 3:13 pm said:

    Unlike the british ways of conquering, looting, destroying, raping , hunging and deporting, the viking knew how to approach other civilization.

    By trading.

  33. Frank on May 30, 2014 at 3:55 pm said:

    We put up a Nidstang and against all those who misuse our old Norwegian symbols for their own purposes. Like the Naziz and others.

  34. Earl P. Holt III on May 30, 2014 at 9:12 pm said:

    When the white race becomes extinct, the North American Continent will enter a new Dark Ages and — eventually — there will be no record that even New York City or Washington, D.C. existed.

    The only remnants of our civilization will be Quadrillions of pieces of paper money, with Barack Hussein Obama’s portrait on the Trillion dollar-bill…

    • g gordon on May 31, 2014 at 1:21 pm said:

      It is obvious from your comment that you are yet another deluded fool who calls himself/her self a Republican.

  35. Veracitus on May 30, 2014 at 11:04 pm said:

    Initially people think this is proof of Norse settlement. I disagree. These are not bones, they are tools. Tools that could have been left behind, stolen or passed down an increasingly Native American family tree. They could have gone coast to coast via trade networks.

  36. Annika on May 31, 2014 at 8:53 pm said:

    For everyone talking about Columbus Day, Minneapolis officially made the change to Indigenous Peoples Day… others (including on Change.org) have asked to switch it Exploration Day.

  37. Andrew Davis on June 1, 2014 at 12:36 pm said:

    I am currently working on DNA analysis of skeletal remains discovered in the 1970′s in the USA. The location was a creek running eventually to the Mississippi and they were discovered with several artifacts that clearly denote they were not indigenous in origin. My company has been asked “to prove” that these remains are either Norse in origin or reburied remains from a different location.

    Having run tests three different times and had the results confirmed by two other independent labs, one in Germany and the other in Spain, we cannot show that they are Norse. They are in fact “Welsh” in origin and from circa 480 – 540 AD.

    A colleague has stated that one series of bones show signs of vitamin c deficency and another shows signs of “injury commesurate with fighting”. Two stones, the size of a watermelon, were discovered with the remains and these have clear “writing” on them. I have been informed that these are “runic” but I do not know personally but, an expert was brought in who said they were not runic script and he was promplty dismissed.

    Last Wednesday, we were called to a meeting and told that if we were unable to show that these were not orginally of Norse origin, then we were to stop researching further and to hand over all work to our departmental head and “move on” to the next case.

    Colleagues have told me that this is nothing new and has happened before.

    I came across this discussion and article because I was searching the web for Norse remains in North America and the current research on it to see if anyone else had come to the same conclusions we had in our research.

    All I can say is something is not right.

    • Arwel1936 on June 2, 2014 at 3:30 pm said:

      This is very interesting as it ties in with my research and that of Alan Wilson and others regarding the Welsh in what is now called “America”.
      As a young boy during the war, my grandfather would take me to certain spots along the rivers Ewenny and Ogmore and tell me that this is to where our ancestors had returned, after crossing from America.
      He also told me that when he was a young boy of six or seven years old, his Grandfather told him that members of the family had kept a secret of where several bodies of the ancient Welsh nobility had been buried and that he had been involved in reburying them to stop English and French archaeologists from digging up ancient sites circa 1892 to 1906.
      He always told me that just as there have been eight King Henry’s who have ruled over England, there was more than one King Arthwyr ruling the Khumri and his brother went to ‘America’ at the time of a great catastrophe that befell the land and that Arthwyr went over and was eventually killed there and brought back to Wales and sailed up the Ogmore. He told me that Viking slave traders in Dublin learned of ancient maps that the Welsh had, showing routes from Greenland down into Newfoundland and down the eastern seaboard. On one of my first visits to St.John’s for research, I met an old man who showed me land where he said “Norse and Welsh” traders were buried after settling and raising families.

    • Mark Vinsand on June 3, 2014 at 4:30 am said:

      The T.V. series America Unearthed has found compelling evidence that what we are taught in school is not necessarily the truth and the Smithsonian Institution is one of the worst offenders of covering it up. We were taught in school that Columbus discovered America, even though scientists had confirmed the site in Newfoundland was Norse in the 1960s. I make my opinions based on facts I am presented with and if they make sense or not. We are told that man was just a hunter-gatherer 10,000 years ago, but researchers have found hundreds of stone cities in the Mediterranean that were not above sea level until 10,000 to 12,000 years ago. Now, unless they were adept scuba divers and had machinery better than what we have today, what we are told cannot be correct. What happened to the scientists that were out to find the truth and could not be silenced, no matter how it upset the current view? We need to study everything like that again.

    • Would this have anything to do with the Mandan tribe which was reported to have fair skin and blue eyes?

  38. Glen on June 4, 2014 at 10:50 pm said:

    This is more proof that the America’s were discovered at least 500 years before Columbus; maybe even hundreds of years earlier than that e.g 500-600′s AD. Could it be that if it was true, that many of the North American Indians are actually decedents of the Scandinavian explorers????

  39. R. Johnson on June 6, 2014 at 12:19 am said:

    There is much legitimate evidence of the widespread Norse presence in North America long before Columbus, but it is often ignored, or simply rejected. See” The Last Kings of Norse America,” Beavers Pond Press, 2012.

  40. Scaramouche on June 11, 2014 at 7:09 am said:

    This is telling us that Columbus did not discover the Americas so we will have to rename them to the name of a Norse crew member in the same way that Amerigo Vespucci lent his name to the colonies, but we have done navigators. Why not a more modest crew member such as the pig keeper Norse boats took with them. How about “The United States of Piggery ” got a ring to it I say.

  41. Mr Silly on July 4, 2014 at 4:24 pm said:

    The issue of Germanics going a-wiking, in old English (Anglish Germanic plattDeutsche dialect) aviking or aroving (wandering, journeying) to the shores of modern North America are not in dispute. What is in dispute is whether or not the artifacts are indeed of 1200-1400.
    As per runes, it’s still a matter of conjecture whether these were known by ordinary folk beyond charms and divination. The affluent class took readily to the Latin script because it was the more prestigious- and as monks and priests all returned to Rome- it was necessary for the ruling class to have at least court scribes fluent in Latin.
    Prior to Reformation there was no “Christianity”- it was all one Catholic Apostolic faith.
    Evangelical Protestantism, completely different to the Anglicanism, Presbyterianism, Lutheranism, Calvinism, etc of Europe- is the correct term for the bizarre deformation of Catholicism into the religion of a personal Jesus cult the majority of Americans follow.

  42. Terry Schurr on May 27, 2014 at 2:16 am said:

    Good call concerned!

  43. Robert Carter on May 27, 2014 at 1:28 pm said:

    In Oklahoma there are the runestones, runes carved in rock. there is a museum with what is left of them. There were hundreds spread around the area in Okl and Arkansas to a preacher in the 40′s decided they were Devil’s work and destroyed all he could fine. sure was nice of him

  44. Jane on May 27, 2014 at 2:08 pm said:

    I agree.

  45. Mark Heise on May 27, 2014 at 2:29 pm said:

    Agree with you on sources and verification. But as the article states, this is just now being turned over to the academic community at U of M, so the author qualified his reporting. I will be interested in the site survey results.

    So to all who are poo-pooing this, just remember you have to hear about it first somewhere…this is the first step to a larger study I would hope.

  46. MMactavish on May 27, 2014 at 9:43 pm said:

    Yeah, because if I were a reputable archeologist, WNDR would be the first place I’d want to publish.

  47. Michael Z. Williamson on May 28, 2014 at 4:34 am said:

    Yup, and we first heard about it on a site that tells us aliens are abducting people in South Africa, and a man is building a Space Shuttle with a 3D printer.

  48. Kiffie on May 28, 2014 at 2:52 am said:

    Robert, runes were outlawed by the church the moment Christianity arrived in Europe. The problem was that too many of the runes were useful for evolving languages, and the new Christians ignored the mandate. I guess that preacher was stuck in some three-digit year.

  49. Roland Scales on May 28, 2014 at 12:50 pm said:

    Kiffie, runes persisted in Scandinavia (evolved, but still runes) into the 15th century, by which time Denmark, Sweden and Norway had been firmly Catholic for hundreds of years. Runes fell into disuse simply because everywhere else was using either the Roman or the Cyrillic alphabet.They were re-invented in the 19th century by Romantic mystics – and the Nazis – for their own purposes.

  50. ddb340 on May 30, 2014 at 5:42 pm said:

    Artefact is how the British spell artifact. I am assuming the author of the article is maybe of british origins.

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In The News

USA: Viking Artefacts Discovered Near Great Lakes

viking 26 May, 2014

Michigan| A group of amateur archaeologists searching for the remains of a native american settlements near the town of Cheboygan, on the coast of Lake Huron, have uncovered a large quantity of artefacts, allegedly of Norse or Viking origin. A total of 194 objects, mostly made from various metals including silver, iron, copper and tin, were found on what could be the site of an ancient viking trade post, controlling the Straights of Mackinac, that leads to Lake Michigan.

The artefacts are of various nature and geographical origin. Swords, axes and other weapons from Scandinavian or Germanic origin, silver buttons and a balance scale allegedly from the British isles, hair combs and knife handles made of walrus ivory and originating from Greenland or Iceland… The presence of all these goods suggests an elaborate and efficient economic system based on long-distance trade.

Archaeologists had been searching the eastern coast of North America for signs of the passage of Norsemen, ever since the discovery in 1960 of the site of l’Anse aux Meadows, in Newfoundland, Canada. Many items found on that first site had suggested that an elaborate network of trade existed between that specific Norse colony and the American continent. Such clues included the remains of butternuts, which didn’t grow on any land north of the province of New Brunswick, and therefore had to be “imported”. Other possible Norse outposts were identified in 2012, in Nanook, in the Tanfield Valley on Baffin Island, as well as in Nunguvik, on the Willows Island and the Avayalik Islands.

This is however the first Viking settlement discovered in the area of the North American Great Lakes, and this could bring a lot of new information concerning the actual extent of their trade network on the continent. The site is strategically located to enable control of the waterways leading to both Lake Michigan and Lake Erie, while enabling a navigable access to the St-Lawrence Bassin and the Atlantic Ocean. All of the items already already recovered have been transfered for further analysis to the Department of Archaeology of the University of Michigan, which has also inherited the responsability for the site. Further research should be done over the next months to complete the survey of the site and gather all possible remaining artefacts.

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